Top Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes and Sayings by The Heroine of Abolition

Top Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes and Rebellious Sayings
Harriet Tubman Quotes Author of 12 Years a Slave
Who is Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c.  January 29, 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some thirteen missions to rescue approximately seventy enslaved people, family, and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped abolitionist John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry. During the American Civil War, she served as an armed scout and spy for the United States Army. In her later years, Tubman was an activist in the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Born a slave in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten and whipped by her various masters as a child. Early in life, she suffered a traumatic head wound when an irate slave owner threw a heavy metal weight intending to hit another slave but hit her instead. The injury caused dizziness, pain, and spells of hypersomnia, which occurred throughout her life. She was a devout Christian and experienced strange visions and vivid dreams, which she ascribed to premonitions from God.

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes
Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes 

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

 Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

Harriet Tubman Inspirational Quotes

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, then immediately returned to Maryland to rescue her family. Slowly, one group at a time, she brought relatives with her out of the state, and eventually guided dozens of other slaves to freedom. Traveling by night and in extreme secrecy, Tubman (or “Moses”, as she was called) “never lost a passenger”. After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed, she helped guide fugitives farther north into British North America and helped newly freed slaves find work. Tubman met the abolitionist John Brown in 1858, and helped him plan and recruit supporters for the raid on Harpers Ferry.

When the Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the raid at Combahee Ferry, which liberated more than 700 slaves. After the war, she retired to the family home on property she had purchased in 1859 in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She was active in the women’s suffrage movement until illness overtook her and she had to be admitted to a home for elderly African Americans that she had helped to establish years earlier. After she died in 1913, she became an icon of courage and freedom.
source: Wikipedia.org

The major significance of Harriet Tubman is that she is seen as a symbol of how black people resisted slavery during the time before the Civil War. Tubman is famous for being the “Moses” of her people because she did so much work to help slaves to escape from the South. Tubman was born a slave in 1820.

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”
― Harriet Tubman

“If you hear the dogs, keep going. If you see the torches in the woods, keep going. If there’s shouting after you, keep going. Don’t ever stop. Keep going. If you want a taste of freedom, keep going.”
― Harriet Tubman

“Twant me, ‘it was the Lord. I always told him, ‘I trust to you. I don’t know where to go or what to do, but I expect you to lead me,’ and He always did.”
― Harriet Tubman

“I had reasoned this out in my mind; there was on of two things I had a right to, liberty or death; if I could not have one, I would have the other; for no man should take me alive.”

tags: inspirational 43 likes Like
“Every great dream begins with a dreamer.”
― Harriet Tubman

“When I found I had crossed that line, I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person. There was such a glory over everything.”
― Harriet Tubman

“There was one of two things I had a right to liberty or death. If I could not have one, I would take the other, for no man should take me alive. I should fight for liberty as long as my strength lasted.”
― Harriet Tubman

“I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person.”
― Harriet Tubman
tags: slavery 31 likes Like
“I am at peace with God and all mankind.”
― Harriet Tubman to Mary Talbert on the occasion of their last visit 1913

“In my mind, I see a line. And over that line, I see green fields and lovely flowers and beautiful white women with their arms stretched out to me over that line, but I can’t seem to get there no-how. I can’t seem to get over that line.”
― Harriet Tubman

“There was one of two things I had a right to liberty or death. If I could not have one, I would have the other; for now man should take me alive.”
― Harriet Tubman

“every great dream begins with a dream”
― harriet tubman

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer”
― Harriet Tubman

“I looked at my hands to see if I was the same person now I was free. There was such glory over everything. The sun came up like gold through the trees and I felt like I was in heaven.”
― Harriet Tubman

“God’s time is always near. He gave me my strength and he set the North Star in the heavens; He meant I should be free.”
― Harriet Tubman

“If I could have convinced more slaves that they were slaves, I could have freed thousands more.”
― Harriet Tubman