Joker (2019) New Best Image Quotes and Movie Trailer

It is very hard for an actor to be believed as Joker as Heath Ledger, we saw what comes after him not good like him like the joker of Suicide Squad. but this time it is not the Joker of Batman Movies.

He is a normal man, be became a victim of Society, Failed comedian Arthur Fleck encounters violent thugs while wandering the streets of Gotham City dressed as a clown. Disregarded by society, Fleck begins a slow descent into madness as he transforms into the criminal mastermind known as The Joker.

Joker Arthur Fleck I used to think that my life was a tragedy, but now I realize, it's a comedy.

 

 Fleck: Is it just me, or is it getting crazier out there?

 

Arthur Fleck: My mother always tells me to smile and put on a happy face. She told me I had a purpose: to bring laughter and joy to the world.

 

joker 2019: better the blind man

 

Joker Arthur Fleck best quotes.
Joker Arthur Fleck best quotes.

 

Joker Arthur Fleck best quotes.

 

The movie is predicted to be the highest rating in IMDB. the movie will never be Success without the great actor Arthur Fleck
  • Director: Todd Phillips
  • Writers: Todd Phillips (screenplay), Scott Silver (screenplay)
  • Stars: Robert De Niro, Joaquin Phoenix, Marc Maron

Best Quotes of Joker (2019)

Arthur Fleck: I used to think that my life was a tragedy, but now I realize, it’s a comedy.

Arthur Fleck: Is it just me, or is it getting crazier out there?

Arthur Fleck: My mother always tells me to smile and put on a happy face. She told me I had a purpose: to bring laughter and joy to the world.

 

Arthur Fleck: Better the blind man who pisses out the window than the joker who told him it was a urinal. Know who the joker is? It’s everybody.

Arthur Fleck: You don’t listen, do you? You just ask the same questions every week. “How’s your job?” “Are you having any negative thoughts?” All I have are negative thoughts.

Arthur Fleck: [written in notebook] The worst part of having a mental illness is people expect you to behave as if you don’t.

Thomas Wayne: Gotham’s lost its way. What kind of coward would do something that cold-blooded? Someone who hides behind a mask.

One more thing
Arthur Fleck: Murray, one more thing?
Murray Franklin: Yeah?
Arthur Fleck: When you bring me out, could you introduce me as Joker?

 

People are starting to notice
Arthur Fleck: Throughout my whole life, I didn’t know if I really existed. But I do, and people are starting to notice.

The worst thing about mental illness

Arthur Fleck: [written in notebook] The worst part of having a mental illness is people expect you to behave as if you don’t.

Arthur Fleck: You don’t listen, do you? You just ask the same questions every week. “How’s you job?” “Are you having any negative thoughts?” All I have are negative thoughts.

How about another joke,Murray

Arthur Fleck: How about another joke, Murray?

Murray Franklin: No, I think we’ve had enough of your jokes.

Arthur Fleck: What do you get…

Murray Franklin: I don’t think so.

Arthur Fleck: …when you cross…

Murray Franklin: I think we’re done here now, thank you.

Arthur Fleck: …a mentally ill loner with a society that abandons him and treats him like trash?

Murray Franklin: Call the police, Gene, call the police.

Arthur Fleck: I’ll tell you what you get! You get what you fuckin’ deserve!

[Joker shoots Murray in the head, killing him instantly]

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Social Worker: Is something funny?

Arthur Fleck: I just thought of a funny joke!

Social Worker: Do you mind telling it?

Arthur Fleck: …You wouldn’t get it.

Arthur Fleck: I used to think that my life was a tragedy, but now I realize, it’s a comedy.

Murray Franklin: I’m waiting for the punchline.

Arthur Fleck: There is no punchline.

Arthur Fleck: I had a bad day.

Gotham’s lost its way

Thomas Wayne: Gotham’s lost its way. What kind of coward would do something that cold-blooded? Someone who hides behind a mask.

 

Arthur Fleck: Everybody’s telling me my stand-ups, are ready for the big clubs.

Arthur Fleck: I know it seems strange, I don’t mean to make you uncomfortable, I don’t know why everyone is so rude, I don’t know why you are; I don’t want anything from you. Maybe a little warmth, maybe a hug dad, maybe a bit of common decency!

I hope my death makes more cents than my life

Arthur Fleck: [In Arthur’s notebook] I hope my death makes more cents than my life.

I hope my death makes more cents than my life

 

Arthur Fleck: Have you seen what it’s like out there, Murray? Do you ever actually leave the studio? Everybody just yells and screams at each other. Nobody’s civil anymore. Nobody thinks what it’s like to be the other guy. You think men like Thomas Wayne ever think what it’s like to be someone like me? To be somebody but themselves? They don’t. They think that we’ll just sit there and take it, like good little boys! That we won’t werewolf and go wild!

 

Arthur Fleck: Please, I don’t support that language, just don’t… DON’T!

 

Social Worker: They don’t give a shit about people like you, Arthur. And they don’t give a shit about people like me either.

Arthur Fleck: You get what you fu**ing deserve!

 

Arthur Fleck: [In Arthur’s Jokebook] I just hope my death make more cents than my life.

 

Arthur Fleck: I killed those guys because they were awful. Everybody is awful these days. It’s enough to make anyone crazy.

 

Arthur Fleck: [from trailer] You know I do stand-up comedy, you should come to see a show sometime.

Sophie Dumond: I could do that.

Murray Franklin: [from trailer] All that sacrifice, she must love you very much.

Arthur Fleck: [from trailer] I feel like I know you… I’ve been watching you forever.

Murray Franklin: Well there’s something special about you Arthur I could tell.

Arthur Fleck: But you don’t listen. I’m just trying to make me smile.

Thomas Wayne: [after punching Arthur] Touch my son again and I’ll fuc**ing kill you!

 

Sophie Dumond: [from trailer] You’re so funny, Arthur.

Thomas Wayne: [as Arthur is laughing at him] Is this a joke to you?

[punches Arthur in the face]

Sophie Dumond: Were you following me today?

Arthur Fleck: Uh, yeah.

Sophie Dumond: I thought that was you. I was hoping you’d come in and rob the place.

Arthur Fleck: Um, I have a gun… Can I can come by tomorrow?

Sophie Dumond: Chuckles… You’re so funny, Arthur.

[Arthur is making a little kid laugh on the bus]

Boy’s Mother: Would you please stop bothering my kid?

Watch the New Trailer

For more information visit https://www.warnerbros.com

The Irishman (2019) Top Movie and book Quotes: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran

The Irishman (2019) Top Movie and book Quotes: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran

The Movie is different than the book. You should watch the movie, Great Movie. 


The Irishman (2019) Top Quotes

The Irishman is the story of Frank Sheeran, a mob hitman, and World War II vet who develops his skills during his service in Italy. Now an old man, he reflects on the events that defined his career as a hitman, particularly the role he played in the disappearance of labor leader Jimmy Hoffa, his longtime friend, and his involvement with the Bufalino crime family.

Who is the real Frank Sheeran?
Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran was an American labor union official who was accused of having links to the Bufalino crime family. In his capacity as a high-ranking official in the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Sheeran was a leading figure in the corruption of unions by organized crime.

real Frank Sheeran

Cast:
Robert De Niro as Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran
Al Pacino as Jimmy Hoffa
Joe Pesci as Russell Bufalino
Bobby Cannavale as Felix “Skinny Razor” DiTullio
Harvey Keitel as Angelo Bruno
Stephen Graham as Anthony Provenzano
Kathrine Narducci as Carrie Bufalino
Domenick Lombardozzi as Anthony Salerno
Anna Paquin as Peggy Sheeran

Jimmy Hoffa: I understand you’re a brother of mine.

Frank Sheeran: Yeah, yeah. Glad to meet you.

Jimmy Hoffa: I heard you paint houses.

Frank Sheeran: Yes, I do.

Jimmy Hoffa: Would you like to be a part of this, Frank? Would you like to be a part of this history?

Frank Sheeran: Yes, I would. Whatever you need me to do, I’m available.

Russell Bufalino: [to Hoffa] You might be demonstrating a failure to show appreciation.

[from the trailer, Frank sits in front of lawyer Bill Buffalino’s desk]
Bill Bufalino: Frank… Sheeran. Isn’t that right?
Frank Sheeran: Yeah, you said it right.
Bill Bufalino: Uh, under the contract, management can only fire a driver under very specific charges. So, you ever show up late?
Frank Sheeran: [lying] No.
Bill Bufalino: You have any moving violations?
Frank Sheeran: [lying] No.
Bill Bufalino: Do you drink on the job?
Frank Sheeran: [lying] No.
Bill Bufalino: You ever hit anybody?
Frank Sheeran: …On the job?
Bill Bufalino: Yeah.
Frank Sheeran: [definitely lying] I don’t think so.
Bill Bufalino: Alright, then, we have nothing to worry about.
[Frank smiles. Bill taps his pen and looks at Frank in silence]
Bill Bufalino: You know, I don’t, uh… I don’t care whether you did it or not. That makes no difference to me.
Frank Sheeran: Yeah, I know.
Bill Bufalino: I’m here to defend you. Right?
Frank Sheeran: Right.
[Bill keeps eyeing Frank]
Frank Sheeran: Whaddaya wanna know? You wanna know if I did it or not?
they both laugh

Jimmy Hoffa: You always charge a guy with a gun! With a knife, you run away.

[watching Kennedy on the TV]
Jimmy Hoffa: We’re going to war with these people.

Russell Bufalino: [to Frank] A friend of ours is having a little trouble. A friend at the top.

Frank Sheeran: [voice over] Back then, there was nobody in this country who didn’t know who Jimmy Hoffa was.

Jimmy Hoffa: Get the gun out of his hand!

Bill Bufalino: I want you to meet my cousin, Russell Bufalino.
[Frank and Russell shake hands]
Frank Sheeran: How are you?
Russell Bufalino: Hey. Nice to meet you.

Young Peggy Sheeran: Where are you going?
Frank Sheeran: I’m going to work.

Frank Sheeran: [voice over] It was like the army. You followed orders, you did the right thing. You got rewarded.

Jimmy Hoffa: You always charge a guy with a gun. With a knife, you run away. So you charge with a gun. With a knife, you run.

[Russell picks up a call]
Russell Bufalino: Hello? Hi, my friend. I got that kid I was talking to you about here. I’m going to put him on the phone and let you talk to him, okay?
Frank Sheeran: Hello?
Jimmy Hoffa: Is that Frank?
Frank Sheeran: Yes.
Jimmy Hoffa: Hiya, Frank. This is Jimmy Hoffa.
Frank Sheeran: Glad to meet you.
Jimmy Hoffa: Glad to meet you too, even if it’s over the phone. Our friend speaks very highly of you.
Frank Sheeran: Thank you.

Jimmy Hoffa: I understand you’re a brother of mine.
Frank Sheeran: Yeah, yeah.

Jimmy Hoffa: I heard you paint houses.
Frank Sheeran: Yes, I do, sir.

Jimmy Hoffa: Would you like to be a part of history?
Frank Sheeran: Yes, I would.
Jimmy Hoffa: Big business and the government are working together, trying to pull us apart. Something’s got to be done.

Jimmy Hoffa: Well, you know, this situation going on now, Frank. Big business and the government, they’re trying to pull us down.

Jimmy Hoffa: Do you want to be part of this thing? Would you like to be part of this history?
Frank Sheeran: Yes, I would. Whatever you need me to do, I’m available.

[after Frank has finished his call to Jimmy]
Russell Bufalino: He likes to talk, doesn’t he?

Angelo Bruno: [to Frank] What else did he say?
[Frank doesn’t reply]
Angelo Bruno: Now’s not the time to not say.

Russell Bufalino: Only three people in the world have one of these, and only one of them is Irish.

Russell Bufalino: [to Jimmy] You might be demonstrating a failure to show appreciation.

[referring to Hoffa]
Russell Bufalino: Things have gotten out of hand with our friend.

Frank Sheeran: You got to sit down. Everybody says so.
Jimmy Hoffa: No, I’m not sitting down! I can’t do it!

Russell Bufalino: It’s what it is.
Frank Sheeran: What it is.

Jimmy Hoffa: I know things they don’t know I know.

Some Quotes from “I Heard You Paint Houses”: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa 

Best Quotes from the book Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“People in those days didn’t display affection like they do today. I’m still learning how to be affectionate to my grandchildren. I don’t ever remember getting a kiss from my mother. I never even saw her kiss my kid brother, or my kid sister, Margaret. Not that anyone meant to play favorites, but Tom was my father’s favorite and Peggy was my mother’s. I guess I was so big, and being the oldest, they expected me to be more grown up than the two younger ones.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“I often said that when they put me in jail in 1981 it was not the FBI’s intent, but they saved my life. They only have seven days in a week, and by the time I went to jail I was drinking eight.”
― Charles Brandt, I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank “the Irishman” Sheeran and Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“impatient. I had to do things the Army’s way: hurry up and wait.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“first heard the song “Tuxedo Junction” in 1941. I was an MP in Colorado, pulling guard duty at Lowry Field for the Army Air Corps. Most people think it was Glenn Miller who first made that song famous, but it was a black bandleader named Erskine Hawkins.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“If you could refresh my recollection on that matter I might be able to recall what you want me to recall, but at this particular time I do not recall the particulars of that particular matter.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“I can’t remember any of us Sheeran kids ever having a toy of our own. One Christmas we got a pair of roller skates to share. They were metal skates, and you could adjust the size. We learned to go without. And if we wanted something we had to fend for ourselves. I had my first job when I was seven, helping a guy clean out the ashes from cellars. And if I managed to get some work cutting somebody’s grass for spending money and my father found out about it, he’d wait up the block until I got paid, and then he’d come down and take the big coins and leave me maybe a dime. We”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“The deportation proceedings and appeals would last for fifteen years, but they were always hanging over Russell’s head. In the end, when he lost his last appeal and had packed his bags and had his tickets, I recommended a lawyer to him who went through the Italian government, spread a little lira, and got it so the Italian government refused to take Russell, and that was that. America had to keep him.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Then one day this guy, Whispers DiTullio, came over to my table at the Bocce Club and bought me a glass of wine.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Whispers told me to meet him at the Melrose Diner. So I went around there. You wouldn’t expect to see any people from downtown at the Melrose Diner. It’s more for the crowd grabbing a bite to eat before they go to a Phillies game. You get a nice piece of apple pie there with hot vanilla syrup on it. Whispers sat down and asked me if I could use ten grand. I told him to keep talking.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“One cold night in December 1941 I won a dance contest jitterbugging to “Tuxedo Junction” at the Denver Dance Hall. The next thing I knew I was on a troop train at four in the morning heading for the West Coast to defend California. The Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. I just turned twenty-one and I was 6′2″. Four years later when the war ended I got my discharge one day before I turned twenty-five; I was 6′ 4″. I had grown two inches.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Whispers was one of these short Italian guys in his early thirties that you’d see all around South Philly, just trying to get by with one hustle or another. This is not the same Whispers they blew up when they bombed his car around the same time. This is the other Whispers. I didn’t know the one they blew up; I just heard about it. I”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“They say the average number of days of actual combat for a veteran is around eighty. By the time the war was over the Army told me I had 411 combat days, which entitled me to $20 extra”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“I didn’t know anything about “made men” back then. That’s a special status in the alleged mob where you go through a ceremony and after that, you are then untouchable. Nobody can whack you without approval. You get extra respect wherever you go. You are part of the “in” crowd, the inner circle. It only applies to Italians. Later on, I got so close to Russell that I was higher up than a made man. Russell even said that to me. He said, “Nobody can ever touch you because you are with me.” I can still feel him gripping my cheek with that strong grip of his and telling me, “You should have been an Italian.” If”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“When he got work my father worked as a steelworker, high up on tall buildings, walking on beams like those Mohawk Indians. It was dangerous work. People were always falling to their death. He worked on the building of the Ben Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia and on the few high-rise buildings they could afford to build in the Depression.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“The only thing is that Whispers had the worst breath known to man or beast. He suffered from halitosis so bad you’d think he was growing garlic in his belly. No amount of chewing gum or mints did him any good. So he was only allowed to whisper when he talked to people.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Eliciting information from Frank Sheeran about his combat experiences was the most difficult part of the interview process. It was two years before he could accept the fact that his combat experience was even worth discussing. And then it became painstaking and stressful for both a respectful questioner and his reluctant subject, with many stops and starts. To”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“To help me understand his combat days, Sheeran tracked down the 45th Infantry Division’s hardbound, 202-page official Combat Report, issued within months of World War II’s end. The more I learned from both this report and Frank himself, the clearer it seemed to me that it was during his prolonged and unremitting combat duty that Frank Sheeran learned to kill in cold blood. The”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Not all people are affected the same way by the same events. We are each our own fingerprints and the sum of our own life’s experiences.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“They had steam heat in the school. The heat came from radiators and we’d have to wait for them to warm up. I stuck the Limburger in the radiator. It heated up and got softer and softer and slowly stunk the whole room up. They called my father, who was the school janitor. He followed the smell and found the Limburger, and then some other kid ratted me out. My old man said he’d see me when he got home. When I got home and waited for him I knew that as soon as he got home he was going to get the boxing gloves out and toss them to me. Sure enough, when he came through the door he calmly said, “What do you want to do, eat first or eat after I kick your ass?” I said, “I’ll eat first.” I knew I wouldn’t feel like eating dinner afterward. I got it pretty good that night, but at least I got some food in me. I”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“The Sicilian people were very friendly. Once we drove the Germans out I got to see Catania, where every house had homemade spaghetti drying on the clothesline. After the war, Russell Bufalino liked the fact that I went right through his town. My”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Charlie explained to me that an exploding shell is going to spread its shrapnel on an angle upward. You get down and stay down and let it sail over you. Otherwise, it cuts you in half right across your chest. When we were kids I looked out for Diggsy,”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“But back then we had to amuse ourselves, and fighting seemed to be all we had. Looking back, it was good for us. You got a lot out of your system. And you learned a lot. And then when our country needed soldiers we were in shape. We already had mental toughness. I graduated from the eighth grade”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“If you were AWOL when your company was going back into combat you might as well keep going because your own officers would blow you away, and they didn’t even have to say it was the Germans. That’s desertion in the face of the enemy. While”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“principal was on the stage singing and leading us in the old song “On the Road to Mandalay.” He would emphasize by winking after each line of the song like some vaudeville singer. Being so tall I stood out and he could look right at me. So every time he would wink I would imitate him and wink back at him. When we got done with the assembly he told me to wait in his office for him. I went and sat there in the chair in front of his desk. He was a pretty big man, my height, only he outweighed me. He walked into the office, came up behind me, and cuffed me hard on the back of the head just the way my father used to whenever I lost one of his beer bets for him. “You fat fuck,” I said and jumped up and decked him. I broke his jaw, and they expelled me permanently on the spot. Naturally,”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“You fat fuck,” I said and jumped up and decked him. I broke his jaw, and they expelled me permanently on the spot. Naturally,”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Naturally, I knew what to expect when my father got home. I had a lot of time to think about it, but all I could think about was breaking the principal’s jaw with just one punch, a grown man. My father walked in the door steaming mad and threw the boxing gloves at me hard. I caught them, but this time I threw them back at him. I said, “You better take another look.” I was sixteen, almost seventeen, by then. “I won’t hit you,” I said. “You’re my father. But you better get yourself another punching bag.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Before a battle or a landing, you get a little nervous tension. Once the shooting starts it goes away. You don’t have time to think. You just do what you have to do. After the battle, it sinks in. We took the Germans by”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“Running up out of the surf on to the beach at St. Tropez I thought I was shot. I looked down and saw red all over my uniform. I hollered for the medic and Lieutenant Kavita from Hazelton, Pennsylvania, came running over to me and shouted, “You son of a bitch, that’s wine. You ain’t shot. Get up and get going. They shot your canteen.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“We finally drove the Germans back and we entered the Alsace-Lorraine region, which is part French and part German.”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

“In Alsace-Lorraine, I saw Pope stick his leg out from behind a tree to get a million-dollar wound so he’d be sent home; only a heavy round came in and took his leg off. He survived and went home with one leg missing. Another”
― Charles Brandt, “I Heard You Paint Houses”, Updated Edition: Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

Actor: Robert De Niro Best Quotes

Actor: Robert De Niro Top Quotes

Actor: Robert De Niro Top Quotes

De Niro was cast as the young Vito Corleone in the 1974 film The Godfather Part II, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. His longtime collaboration with director Martin Scorsese earned him the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Jake LaMotta in the 1980 film Raging Bull. He received the AFI Life Achievement Award in 2003, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 2010, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in 2016.

De Niro’s first major film roles were in the sports drama Bang the Drum Slowly (1973) and Scorsese’s crime film Mean Streets (1973). He earned Academy Award nominations for the psychological thrillers Taxi Driver (1976) and Cape Fear (1991), both directed by Scorsese. De Niro received additional nominations for Michael Cimino’s Vietnam war drama The Deer Hunter (1978), Penny Marshall’s drama Awakenings (1990), and David O. Russell’s romantic comedy-drama Silver Linings Playbook (2012). His portrayal of gangster Jimmy Conway in Scorsese’s crime film Goodfellas (1990), and his role as Rupert Pupkin in the black comedy film The King of Comedy (1983), earned him BAFTA Award nominations.

De Niro has earned four nominations for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, for his work in the musical drama New York, New York (1977), the action comedy Midnight Run (1988), the gangster comedy Analyze This (1999), and the comedy Meet the Parents (2000). Other notable performances include roles in 1900 (1976), Once Upon a Time in America (1984), Brazil (1985), The Mission (1986), The Untouchables (1987), Heat (1995), and Casino (1995). He has directed and starred in films such as the crime drama A Bronx Tale (1993) and the spy film The Good Shepherd (2006).

I didn’t have a problem with rejection, because when you go into an audition, you’re rejected already. There are hundreds of other actors. You’re behind the eight ball when you go in there.
Robert De Niro

I spent lunchtime in a grave during the filming of ‘Bloody Mama.’ When you’re younger, you feel that’s what you need to do to help you stay in character. When you get older, you become more confident and less intense about it – and you can achieve the same effect.
Robert De Niro

If it’s a very emotional scene, you’re kind of relieved when you’ve done it, kind of spent. And there are times when you can be rattled, certain characters if they’re hyper, that can carry over, the residue of that. But I try to leave it on the set.
Robert De Niro

Movies are hard work. The public doesn’t see that. The critics don’t see it. But they’re a lot of work. A lot of work.
Robert De Niro

The hardest thing about being famous is that people are always nice to you.
Robert De Niro

In acting, I always try to go back to what would actually be the real situation, the real human behavior in life.
Robert De Niro

My mother worked for a woman, Maria Ley-Piscator, who with her husband founded the Dramatic Workshop, which was connected to the New School. My mother did proofreading and typing and stuff or her, and as part of her payment, I was able to take acting classes there on Saturdays when I was 10.
Robert De Niro

With ‘Silver Linings,’ I didn’t feel – I was thinking of certain things, but I just said, ‘Let me go with it.’ You have to know what you’re doing, where you’re going with the scenes, and I put a lot of work into that. But when you’re out there, at the same time you gotta be ready for anything.
Robert De Niro

I’ll work with a director if I think I’m going to get into a comfortable situation, and if it’s someone I respect and who respects me, even if they’re not so well known. Movies are hard to make, and you have to work toward a common ethic and do your best.
Robert De Niro

I don’t like to watch my own movies – I fall asleep in my own movies.
Robert De Niro

I like to visit L.A., but I wouldn’t want to live there.
Robert De Niro

I have so much respect for directors. It’s a tremendous amount of pressure; you have to keep steadfast and keep what you know is right.
Robert De Niro

I’m not a big football person at all.
Robert De Niro

The director respects what they’ve hired you for and chosen you for: to do the part and respect what you’re doing.
Robert De Niro

When I was 15, 16, I studied with Stella Adler at the Conservatory of Acting, then I stopped again and went to the Actors Studio when I was 18.
Robert De Niro

I don’t get into these long-winded heavy discussions about character – do we do this or that or what. At the end of the day, what you gotta do is just go out there and do it.
Robert De Niro

You draw on whatever’s relevant to the part you’re playing; it makes it more personal.
Robert De Niro

My definition of a good hotel is a place I’d stay at.
Robert De Niro

When you make a drama, you spend all day beating a guy to death with a hammer, or what have you. Or, you have to take a bite out of somebody’s face. On the other hand, with a comedy, you yell at Billy Crystal for an hour, and you go home.
Robert De Niro

I’ve never been one of those actors who has touted myself as a fascinating human being. I had to decide early on whether I was to be an actor or a personality.
Robert De Niro

I go to Paris, I go to London, I go to Rome, and I always say, ‘There’s no place like New York. It’s the most exciting city in the world now. That’s the way it is. That’s it.’
Robert De Niro

You learned the two greatest thing in life, never rat on your friends, and always keep your mouth shut.
Robert De Niro

If it’s the right chair, it doesn’t take too long to get comfortable in it.
Robert De Niro

Time goes on. So whatever you’re going to do, do it. Do it now. Don’t wait.
Robert De Niro

I love to find new people. It’s not for the sake of their being new; it’s because if you find someone who perfectly fits a part, that’s such a great thing.
Robert De Niro

There’s nothing more ironic or contradictory than life itself.
Robert De Niro

You’ll have time to rest when you’re dead.
Robert De Niro

Good directors can bring certain things out of you, with their intensity or gentleness or sensitivity or understanding. They can make an actor feel he can do no wrong.
Robert De Niro

There is a certain combination of anarchy and discipline in the way I work.
Robert De Niro

One of the things about acting is it allows you to live other people’s lives without having to pay the price.
Robert De Niro

You never know what you do that could be totally out of left field, which actually might work and give something fresh to the whole scene, to the character, whatever. If you have that with a director who then knows how to shape it, either in the direction, in the moment, or in the editing, then that’s good.
Robert De Niro

Italy has changed. But Rome is Rome.
Robert De Niro

I mean, the actors that I admired were Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, an actress named Barbara Harris. And Greta Garbo. They were great actors.
Robert De Niro

I always tell actors when they go in for an audition: Don’t be afraid to do what your instincts tell you. You may not get the part, but people will take notice.
Robert De Niro

It’s important not to indicate. People don’t try to show their feelings, they try to hide them.
Robert De Niro

I think Hollywood has a class system. The actors are like the inmates, but the truth is they’re running the asylum.
Robert De Niro

Money makes your life easier. If you’re lucky to have it, you’re lucky.
Robert De Niro

The talent is in the choices.
Robert De Niro

I always go back to how people behave. If you watch how people actually behave in a situation, it’s very simple and honest and contained. You don’t need to use as much expression, as much feeling. Some characters will boil over, and that’s another thing, but a lot of times I think you can just do very, very little.
Robert De Niro

I think it’s important to have had at least a few years of obscurity, where people treat you like everybody else.
Robert De Niro