Unknown Valley (1933) w/ Buck Jones

Unknown Valley (1933) Buck Jones Free streaming film

Starred by Buck Jones, Cecilia Parker, Wade Boteler

Looking for his missing father, Joe Gordon heads into the desert where Elders from a secret village find him unconscious. Attracted to Sheilla O’Neill, the two plan an escape from the village where no one is allowed to leave. But then he learns his father is being held prisoner and finding him, he is also made a prisoner.

Brave New World Inspiring Book Image Quotes and Short Sayings

Best Image Quotes from Brave New World Book by Aldous Huxley and short excerpts

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

The Brave New World character Mustapha Mond, Resident World Controller of Western Europe, is named after Sir Alfred Mond. … Huxley used the setting and characters in his science fiction novel to express widely held opinions, particularly the fear of losing individual identity in the fast-paced world of the future.

Banned for Atheism and Racism

Mustapha Mond at one point says that if there were a God, he would not be present in the society of the World State because he isn’t needed.

“Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly — they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want to sin.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Universal happiness keeps the wheels steadily turning, truth and beauty can’t.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“Never put off till tomorrow the fun you can have today.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Did you ever feel, as though you had something inside you that was only waiting for you to give it a chance to come out? Some sort of extra power that you aren’t using – you know, like all the water that goes down the falls instead of through the turbines?”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I’m claiming the right to be unhappy.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“When people are suspicious with you, you start being suspicious with them.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“We don’t want to change. Every change is a menace to stability.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“Happiness has got to be paid for. You’re paying for it, Mr. Watson–paying because you happen to be too much interested in beauty. I was too much interested in truth; I paid too.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Those who meant well behaved in the same way as those who meant badly.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“It isn’t only art that is incompatible with happiness, it’s also science. Science is dangerous, we have to keep it most carefully chained and muzzled.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Back to culture. Yes, actually to culture. You can’t consume much if you sit still and read books.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“What’s the point of truth or beauty or knowledge when anthrax bombs are popping all around you?”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the over-compensations for misery.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“The optimum population is modeled on the iceberg- eight-ninths below the water line, one-ninth above.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“God isn’t compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make a choice. Our civilization has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“They’re old; they’re about God hundreds of years ago. Not about God now”
“But God doesn’t change”
“Men do though”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“A physical shortcoming could produce a kind of mental excess. The process, it seemed, was reversible. Mental excess could produce, for its own purposes, the voluntary blindness and deafness of deliberate solitude, the artificial impotence of asceticism.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“O brave new world that has such people in it.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“One can’t have something for nothing. Happiness has got to be paid for. You’re paying for it, Mr. Watson – paying because you happen to be too much interested in beauty.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“This concern with the basic condition of freedom — the absence of physical constraint — is unquestionably necessary, but is not all that is necessary. It is perfectly possible for a man to be out of prison and yet not free — to be under no physical constraint and yet to be a psychological captive, compelled to think, feel and act as the representatives of the national State, or of some private interest within the nation, want him to think, feel and act.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes
  Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“Can you say something about nothing?”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Isn’t there something in living dangerously?”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I don’t want comfort. I want poetry. I want danger. I want freedom. I want sin.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“But every one belongs to everyone else”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“To be excited is still to be unsatisfied.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn’t nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“If one’s different, one’s bound to be lonely.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I want to know what passion is. I want to feel something strongly.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I am I, and I wish I weren’t.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“One believes things because one has been conditioned to believe them.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I like being myself. Myself and nasty.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“Chronic remorse, as all the moralists are agreed, is a most undesirable sentiment. If you have behaved badly, repent, make what amends you can and address yourself to the task of behaving better next time. On no account brood over your wrongdoing. Rolling in the muck is not the best way of getting clean.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“…most men and women will grow up to love their servitude and will never dream of revolution.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“Most human beings have an almost infinite capacity for taking things for granted.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“No social stability without individual stability.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I ate civilization. It poisoned me; I was defiled. And then,” he added in a lower tone, “I ate my own wickedness.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I’d rather be myself,” he said. “Myself and nasty. Not somebody else, however jolly.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“…reality, however utopian, is something from which people feel the need of taking pretty frequent holidays….”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“The Savage interrupted him. “But isn’t it natural to feel there’s a God?”
“You might as well ask if it’s natural to do up one’s trousers with zippers,” said the Controller sarcastically. “You remind me of another of those old fellows called Bradley. He defined philosophy as the finding of bad reason for what one believes by instinct. As if one believed anything by instinct! One believes things because one has been conditioned to believe them. Finding bad reasons for what one believes for other bad reasons–that’s philosophy. People believe in God because they’ve been conditioned to.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“The Savage nodded, frowning. “You got rid of them. Yes, that’s just like you. Getting rid of everything unpleasant instead of learning to put up with it. Whether ’tis better in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles and by opposing end them…But you don’t do either. Neither suffer nor oppose. You just abolish the slings and arrows. It’s too easy.”
…”What you need,” the Savage went on, “is something with tears for a change. Nothing costs enough here.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“One of the principal functions of a friend is to suffer (in a milder and symbolic form) the punishments that we should like, but are unable, to inflict upon our enemies.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

 Brave New World Book Aldous Huxley best quotes

“Great is the truth, but still greater, from a practical point of view, is silence about truth.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“There was a thing called Heaven; but all the same they used to drink enormous quantities of alcohol.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“A love of nature keeps no factories busy.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“I want God, I want poetry, I want danger, I want freedom, I want sin.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Ending is better than mending.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“It is natural to believe in God when you’re alone– quite alone, in the night, thinking about death.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“We are not our own any more than what we possess is our own. We did not make ourselves, we cannot be supreme over ourselves. We are not our own masters.”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Pain was a fascinating horror”
― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

The Time of Their Lives (1946) best Quotes

Abbott and Costello are, respectively, a butler and a tinker in the Revolutionary War-era United States. They both love the same woman, a maid, but she only has eyes for Lou.
Although Bud hopes to dispatch his rival, a group of soldiers mistakenly shoots and kills Costello and Marjorie Reynolds, thinking them traitors, when in fact Lou has a letter of reference from General George Washington and Reynolds (playing Melody Allen) was just about to expose the real traitors (including her fiancé)

Starred by: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Marjorie Reynolds

The Time of Their Lives (1946) best movie quotes

Mildred Dean: [to Emily] Pardon me, but did I see you in “Rebecca?”

 

Horatio Prim: [he and Melody collide and are wearing each other’s clothes] Odds bodkins, we’re all mixed up!

[they run into each other again and get back into their own clothes]

Horatio Prim: Melody, don’t ever do that again, I’m a boy!

 

Horatio Prim: [after seeing Emily for the first time] Zounds! What well did she come out of?

Melody Allen: Here’s a horse pistol.

[Gives him the gun. Horatio turns to the horse behind him]

Horatio Prim: Here, this is for you. Now, what do I shoot with?

Mildred Dean: [to June about Dr. Greenway] Last week he said that the rash I had wasn’t an allergy, it was a guilt complex because I kicked your grandma in the bustle when I was 2 years old.

 

Sheldon Gage: Come on Ralph, now tell us what happened.

Cuthbert Greenway: Bottles floating through space, glasses filling up by themselves, and somebody tooted into my stethoscope!

 

Melody Allen: Horatio, be patient.

Horatio Prim: Be patient? Melody, do you realize that my Nora has been waiting on me for 165 years? And a girl will only wait so long, and no longer!

 

Melody Allen: [turning on the house’s electric lights] What an astonishing idea… probably got it from Ben Franklin, he’s always inventing things.

 

Emily: [in a trance and speaking with the voice of Thomas Danbury] Melody, my beloved, it’s Tom. I’ve come to help you.

June Prescott: Oh, Shelly, what does it mean?

Sheldon Gage: It-it must be Danbury speaking through Emily.

Mildred Dean: Oh, fine. A ghost to ghost broadcast.

 

Horatio Prim: Cuthbert, Melody, it’s Cuthbert! He’s still alive!

Melody Allen: How can that be?

Horatio Prim: I don’t know, they say only the good die young.

Melody Allen: You know no self-respecting ghosts do any haunting before midnight.

Horatio Prim: Alright, I’ll wait. But tonight, I haunt!

Horatio Prim: I don’t want those people coming around here saying,

[singing]

Horatio Prim: Here lie the dirty traitors! Here lie the dirty traitors!

[crying]

Horatio Prim: Here lie the dirty traitors.

 

Melody Allen: [picks up a book] Tom Danbury’s memoirs.

Horatio Prim: His grandmas?

 

Horatio Prim: Odds, bodkins, and copper pots!

At Gunpoint (1955) Best Quotes

Watch At Gunpoint (1955) Full Streaming Movie and its Best Quotes

The peace-loving owner of a general store, who became a town hero when he luckily killed the leader of a gang of bank robbers, is deserted by the townspeople who fear the threatened return of the vengeful bandits.

Starred by Fred MacMurray, Dorothy Malone, Walter Brennan

At Gunpoint (1955) Best Movie Quote

[first lines]
[Bob Dennis is practicing aiming and firing his gun]
Alvin Dennis: You’re sure itchin’ to use that thing again, ain’t ya?
Bob Dennis: Never hurts to be ready.
Alvin Dennis: You’re always ready. Put it away.
Bob Dennis: You’re nervous, huh?
Alvin Dennis: Yeah, well, I wouldn’t be if it wasn’t for you.

Bob Dennis: I’m sick of these two-bit towns. What’s wrong with a place like Abilene for instance?
Alvin Dennis: Everything, as far as we’re concerned.
Bob Dennis: They’re bound to have a lot of cash on hand. They’ve got to pay off the trail drives.
Alvin Dennis: That’s just it. Where’s there’s a lot of cash, there’s a lot of guns.
Bob Dennis: We’re not exactly amateurs.
Alvin Dennis: That’s why we’re alive. And we’ll stay that way as long as we stick to the small towns.

The Stranger: Jack Wright? For some reason or other that name sounds familiar.
Jack Wright: Yeah, it should. I’m a local hero.
The Stranger: You don’t say.
Jack Wright: You’re looking at the man who shot the notorious Alvin Dennis from a distance of half a mile… with a slingshot.

Bob Dennis: I’m going to get him. I’m going to get him if it’s the last thing I do. And he’s mine. No matter what happens, he’s mine… do you understand? All you have to do is cover me. And we’re not leavin’ that town till that storekeeper’s guts have been shot out.

 

Same Story, Different Animal: Joker 2019 and Buck the dog , Arthur Fleck ( 2019 ) and Call of the wild ( 1903 )

Same Story, Different Animal: Buck the dog and Arthur Fleck. Joker 2019 and Call of the wild with Image Quotes

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

There is an old great novel by Jack London called the call of the wild, the book about a dog who was abused by men. same as joker 2019 Joaquin Phoenix, both suffered because of the cruel society. the society did not have mercy on both victims., until they went back to the wild. the dog buck forgot his domestication and became wolve like his ancestor, Arthur fleck went to back to the primitive wild human being. 

“He was a killer, a thing that preyed, living on the things that lived, unaided, alone, by virtue of his own strength and prowess, surviving triumphantly in a hostile environment where only the strong survive.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

The dog Buck and  Arthur Fleck finally exploded and changed drastically, The dog Buck in Call of the world escaped from people and went back to the wild. became wild like his ancestors and joined the wolves, and  Arthur Fleck made the same when you notice the scene of the bathroom

you can see Joker Arthur Fleck get born again. he is acting like he is going outside the womb of the society to be an enemy who has no mercy.

when the joker said “I used to think that my life was a tragedy, but now I realize, it’s a comedy.” he is now understanding there is no meaning in his suffering, it like Black comedy play made by crazy writer.. how can you act in comedy play, you should react with the black comedy with stronger black comedy

The dance in this video was not strange. he is acting like he is reviving again from the womb of the society like baby got born again but in vengeance.

The dog Buck had a similar experience,  He becomes progressively feral in the harsh environment, where he is forced to fight to survive and dominate other dogs. By the end, he sheds the veneer of civilization, and relies on primordial instinct and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild.

I will  make a mix of quotes between Jack London Novel Call of the wild and Joker 2019 because I believe they are same

“There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.”
Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“He had learned well the law of club and fang, and he never forewent an advantage or drew back from a foe he had started on the way to Death. He had lessoned from Spitz, and from the chief fighting dogs of the police and mail, and knew there was no middle course. He must master or be mastered; while to show mercy was a weakness. mercy did not exist in the primordial life. It was misunderstood for fear, and such misunderstandings made for death. Kill or be killed, eat or be eaten, was the law; and this mandate, down out of the depths of Time, he obeyed.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“He had learned well the law of club and fang, and he never forewent an advantage or drew back from a foe he had started on the way to Death. He had lessoned from Spitz, and from the chief fighting dogs of the police and mail, and knew there was no middle course. He must master or be mastered; while to show mercy was a weakness. mercy did not exist in the primordial life. It was misunderstood for fear, and such misunderstandings made for death. Kill or be killed, eat or be eaten, was the law; and this mandate, down out of the depths of Time, he obeyed.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“A man with a club [bat] is a law-maker, a man to be obeyed, but not necessarily conciliated.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wildJoker 2019 the call of the wild
Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Joker 2019 the call of the wild

Arthur Fleck: What do you get when you cross a mentally ill loner with a society that abandons him and treats him like trash? You get what you fuckin’ deserve!

“Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, the call sounding imperious, deep in the forest.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“He felt strangely numb. As though from a great distance, he was aware that he was being beaten. The last sensations of pain left him. He no longer felt anything, though very faintly he could hear the impact of the club upon his body. But it was no longer his body, it seemed so far away.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“The ghostly winter silence had given way to the great spring murmur of awakening life.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

Arthur Fleck: For my whole life, I didn’t know if I even really existed. But I do, and people are starting to notice.

“He must master or be mastered; while to show mercy was a weakness. Mercy did not exist in the primordial life. It was misunderstood for fear, and such misunderstandings made for death. Kill or be killed, eat or be eaten, was the law; and this mandate, down out of the depths of Time, he obeyed.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“But he is not always alone. When the long winter nights come on and the wolves follow their meat into the lower valleys, he may be seen running at the head of the pack through the pale moonlight or glimmering Borealis, leaping gigantic above his fellows, his great throat a-bellow as he sings a song of the younger world, which is the song of the pack.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“There is a patience of the wild–dogged, tireless, persistent as life itself–that holds motionless for endless hours the spider in its web, the snake in its coils, the panther in its ambuscade; this patience belongs peculiarly to life when it hunts its living food;”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“The first theft marked Buck as fit to survive in the hostile Northland environment. It marked his adaptability, his capacity to adjust himself to changing conditions, the lack of which would have meant swift and terrible death. It marked, further, the decay or going to pieces of his moral nature, a vain thing and a handicap in the ruthless struggle for existence.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“He had been suddenly jerked from the heart of civilization and flung into the heart of things primordial.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“He had killed man, the noblest game of all, and he had killed in the face of the law of club and fang.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“He was beaten (he knew that); but he was not broken. He saw, once for all, that he stood no chance against a man with a club. He had learned the lesson, and in all his afterlife he never forgot it. That club was a revelation. It was his introduction to the reign of primitive law, and he met the introduction halfway. The facts of life took on a fiercer aspect; and while he faced that aspect uncowed, he faced it with all the latent cunning of his nature aroused.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“At the first step upon the cold surface, Buck’s feet sank into a white mushy something very like mud. He sprang back with a snort. More of this white stuff was falling through the air. He shook himself, but more of it fell upon him. He sniffed it curiously, then licked some upon his tongue. It bit like fire, and the next instant was gone. This puzzled him. He tried it again, with the same result. The onlookers laughed uproariously, and he felt ashamed, he knew not why, for it was his first snow.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“Sometimes he pursued the call into the forest, looking for it as though it were a tangible thing, barking softly or defiantly… Irresistible impulses seized him. he would be lying in camp, dozing lazily in the heat of the day, when suddenly his head would lift and his ears cock up, intent and listening, and he would spring on his feet and dash away, and on and on, for hours, though the forest aisles.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“But under it all they were men, penetrating the land of desolation and mockery and silence, puny adventurers bent on colossal adventure, pitting themselves against the might of a world as remote and alien and pulseless as the abysses of space. ”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive. This ecstasy, this forgetfulness of living, comes to the artist, caught up and out of himself in a sheet of flame.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“It was an old song, old as the breed itself – one of the first songs of the younger world in a day when songs were sad. It was invested with the woe of unnumbered generations, this plaint by which Buck was so strangely stirred. When he moaned and sobbed, it was with the pain of living that was of old the pain of his wild fathers, and the fear and mystery of the cold and dark that was to them fear and mystery. And that he should be stirred by it marked the completeness with which he harked back through the ages of fire and roof to the raw beginnings of life in the howling ages.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“For the pride of trace and trail was his, and sick unto death, he could not bear that another dog should do his work.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

Social Worker: They don’t give a shit about people like you, Arthur. And they don’t give a shit about people like me either.

“…in his gambling, he had one besetting weakness — faith in a system; and this made his damnation certain. ”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

“There was nothing the matter with them except they were dead tired. It was not the dead tiredness that comes through brief and excessive effort, from which recovery is a matter of hours; but it was the dead-tiredness that comes through the slow and prolonged strength drainage of months of toil.”
― Jack London, The Call of the Wild

You may also like Joker (2019) New Best Image Quotes and Movie Trailer

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Shadow of a Doubt (1943) Best Quotes

Watch Shadow of a Doubt (1943) Free Streaming Movie Public domain

The Newton family leads a quiet life in Santa Rosa, California. The Newton’s eldest daughter, “young Charlie”, decides that things need brightening up and resolves to contact her Uncle Charlie (after whom she is named) and invite him to stay. On arrival at the telegraph office, she discovers he is already on his way. However, Uncle Charlie is being pursued by a couple of detectives who suspect him of being “The Merry Widow Murderer”, an evil strangler wanted in connection with the deaths of several rich East coast widows.

Starred by Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten, Macdonald Carey

Shadow of a Doubt best movie quotes

Uncle Charlie: You think you know something, don’t you? You think you’re the clever little girl who knows something. There’s so much you don’t know, so much. What do you know, really? You’re just an ordinary little girl, living in an ordinary little town. You wake up every morning of your life and you know perfectly well that there’s nothing in the world to trouble you. You go through your ordinary little day, and at night you sleep your untroubled ordinary little sleep, filled with peaceful stupid dreams. And I brought you nightmares. Or did I? Or was it a silly, inexpert little lie? You live in a dream. You’re a sleepwalker, blind. How do you know what the world is like? Do you know the world is a foul sty? Do you know, if you rip off the fronts of houses, you’d find swine? The world’s a hell. What does it matter what happens in it? Wake up, Charlie. Use your wits. Learn something.

 

Uncle Charlie: The cities are full of women, middle-aged widows, husbands, dead, husbands who’ve spent their lives making fortunes, working and working. And then they die and leave their money to their wives, their silly wives. And what do the wives do, these useless women? You see them in the hotels, the best hotels, every day by the thousands, drinking the money, eating the money, losing the money at the bridge, playing all day and all night, smelling of money, proud of their jewelry but of nothing else, horrible, faded, fat, greedy women… Are they human or are they fat, wheezing animals, hmm? And what happens to animals when they get too fat and too old?

Joseph Newton: We’re not talking about killing people. Herb’s talking about killing me and I’m talking about killing him.

 

Ann Newton: God bless Mama, Papa, Captain Midnight, Veronica Lake, and the President of the United States.

 

Young Charlie: Go away, I’m warning you. Go away or I’ll kill you myself. See… that’s the way I feel about you.

 

Ann Newton: The ones that say they don’t want anything always get more in the end.

 

Uncle Charlie: Forty thousand dollars is no joke, not to him, I bet. It’s a joke to me. The whole world’s a joke to me.

[to the telegraph operator]

Young Charlie: Mrs. Henderson, do you believe in telepathy?

Mrs. Henderson: Well, I ought to. That’s my business.

Young Charlie: Oh, not telegraphy. Mental telepathy. Like, well, suppose you have a thought, and suppose the thought’s about someone you’re in tune with, and then across thousands of miles, that person knows what you’re thinking about and answers you, and it’s all mental.

Mrs. Henderson: I don’t know what you’re talking about. I only send telegrams the normal way.

 

Ann Newton: You’d think Mama had never seen a phone. She makes no allowance for science. She thinks she has to cover the distance by sheer lung power.

Young Charlie: He thought the world was a horrible place. He couldn’t have been very happy, ever. He didn’t trust people. Seemed to hate them. He hated the whole world. You know, he said people like us had no idea what the world was really like.

 

[Uncle Charlie visits the bank]

Uncle Charlie: Hello, Joe. Can you stop embezzling a minute and give me your attention?

Joseph Newton: Oh, uh, Charles, we don’t joke about such things here.

Uncle Charlie: Aw, what’s a little shortage in the books at the end of the month? Any good bank clerk can cover up a little shortage. Isn’t that right, Charlie?

Young Charlie: Uncle Charlie, you’re awful. Everyone can hear you.

Uncle Charlie: Good thing they can. We all know what banks are. Look all right to an outsider, but no one knows what goes on when the doors are locked. Can’t fool me, though.

 

Joseph Newton: Don’t put the heat on the bed.

Uncle Charlie: Superstitious, Joe?

Joseph Newton: No, but I don’t believe in inviting trouble.

Uncle Charlie: I got in the habit of carrying a lot of cash with me when I was traveling.

Mr. Green: Dangerous habit, Mr. Oakley.

Uncle Charlie: Never lost a penny in my life, Mr. Green. I guess heaven takes care of fools and scoundrels.

Emma Newton: Don’t whisper. When you whisper, anyone could hear you a block away.

 

Uncle Charlie: How was the church, Charlie? Did you count the house? Turn anybody away?

Young Charlie: No. Room enough for everyone.

Uncle Charlie: Well, I’m glad to hear that. The show’s been running such a long time, I thought maybe attendance might be falling off.

Jack Graham: It seems to go crazy every now and then, like your Uncle Charlie.

Texas, Brooklyn & Heaven (1948)

Watch Texas, Brooklyn & Heaven (1948) Free Streaming Film

Eddie Tayloe’s grandfather leaves him six thousand dollars and the money belt it came in, freeing Tayloe to leave his dull newspaper job in Texas and move to New York to become a playwright. Along the way, his car breaks down and a girl walking along the highway asks for a lift. It turns out she’s a nice girl, named Perry, running away from a job at a gasoline station. Soon they’re off to New York together, but part ways once they arrive. Time passes and Eddie is failing to sell his play; Perry is failing to find a job. Odd circumstances, involving an old pickpocket named Mandy, bring them together again. Three starchy sisters renting a room, a bartender named Mike, and a sleepy old immigrant running a mechanical menagerie all play parts in this romantic comedy.
Stars: Guy Madison, Diana Lynn, James Dunn

Best Quotes of the movie

[first lines]

Mike: What’ll you have?

Perry Dunklin: Do you think he’ll like me in this?

Mandy: Well, I don’t know about him, but a normal male… well, a normal male would be very normal about it.

[last lines]

Customer: So long, Mike.

Mike: So long.

Best J. Howard Moore quotes about humanity, animals, and ethics

Best J. Howard Moore quotes about humanity, animals, and ethics

Best J. Howard Moore quotes

he was a great philosopher was an advocate for animal rights, ethics, and humanity, he died in 1916

John Howard Moore was an American zoologist, philosopher, educator, and socialist. He advocated for the welfare and rights of animals and authored several articles, books, essays, and pamphlets on ethics, vegetarianism, humanitarianism, and education.

All conscious beings are struggling, struggling to keep themselves in joint with their environment. Those things and creatures and events that aid them in their struggles are desirable and they call them good, and those things and creatures and events that oppose and defeat the satisfaction of desires is called bad. Right and wrong exist as conceptions of mind because there are portions of the universe capable of happiness and misery. Erase sentiency from the universe and you erase the possibility of ethics. Every conscious portion of the universe, therefore, has ethical relations to every other conscious portion (man, woman, worm, Eskimo, oyster, ox), but not to inanimate portions (clod, cabbage, river, rose), because the ones are sentient and the others are not.
― J. Howard Moore

Every being is incomparably precious to himself. This is the most mournful feature in human psychology. We did not invent it. It was handed to us along with our fingers and our fondness for eating. It is the psychic calamity of the animal kingdom.
― J. Howard Moore

Best J. Howard Moore quotes

“I am ashamed of the race of beings to which I belong. It is so cruel and bigoted, so hypocritical, so soulless and insane. I would rather be an insect … a bee or a butterfly … and float in dim dreams among the wild-flowers of summer than be a man and feel the horrible and ghastly wrongs and sufferings of this wretched world.”
― J. Howard Moore

The universe, so far as we can make out, is neither all-wise nor all foolish. It is both good and bad. It maintains some of the most careful economies sides by side with the most reckless. The defects of the universe are just as apparent to him who is not cowardly or incompetent as are its excellencies. It is the rogue and the ignoramus who argue in justification of existing barbarisms that these barbarisms are beautiful because they represent the procedures of “nature.” As a matter of fact, all ways are nature’s ways, the unconscious and clumsy as truly as the intelligent and exquisite. The philosophers of laissez-faire, who would have human beings disuse what little intelligence has, during the past twenty millions of years, been developed on the earth, and would have them derive their ethics from the regions of biological somnambulism, are the philosophers to be heeded when humanity goes mad. It is childish to assume that we upper intelligence can not improve on the unconscious conditions about us. It is the very thing that is being done every hour of time. The whole effort of the industry is nothing else than an effort to improve the attitudes of the material universe. And it is just as sagacious to suppose that living beings are incompetent to improve their relations to the inanimate universe as to suppose they may not reform and enhance their relations to each other.
J. Howard Moore

“Yes, do as you would be done by – and not to the dark man and the white woman alone, but to the sorrel horse and the grey squirrel as well; not to creatures of your own anatomy alone, but to all creatures. You cannot go high enough, low enough nor far enough to find those whose bowed and broken beings will not rise up at the coming of the kindly heart, or whose souls will not darken at the touch of inhumanity. Do to beings below as you would be done by beings above you. They are our fellow mortals. They came out of the same mysterious womb of the past, are passing through the same dream, and are destined to the same melancholy end as we ourselves. Let us be kind and merciful to them.”
― J. Howard Moore

“A universe is, indeed, to be pitied whose dominating inhabitants are so unconscious and so ethically embryonic that they make life a commodity, mercy a disease, and systematic massacre a pastime and a profession.”
― J. Howard Moore

The trouble with all ethical systems of this world has been their partiality. They have been arranged with undue regard for those who invented them. And this defect vitiates the prevailing systems to-day as it has vitiated the systems that have been produced in times gone by.
― J. Howard Moore

Best J. Howard Moore quotes

It is simply monstrous, this horrible savagery and somnambulism in which we grope. It is the climax of mundane infamy — the “paragon of the universe” dozing on the pedestal of his imagination and contemplating himself as an interstellar pet and all other beings as commodities. Let us startle ourselves, those of us who can, to a realization of the holocaust we are perpetrating on our feathered and fur-covered friends. For remember the same sentiment of sympathy and fraternity that broke the black man’s manacles and is to-day melting the white woman’s chains will to-morrow emancipate the sorrel horse and the heifer; and as the ages bloom and the great wheels of the centuries grind on, all the races of the earth shall become kind, and this age of ours, so bigoted and raw, shall be remembered in history as an age of insanity, somnambulism, and blood.
― J. Howard Moore

Well, may we be dazed by the horrific metamorphosis? Dark days are upon us. The pendulum of civilization trembles, as if to swing back to the inglorious twilight of the past. Imperialistic tendencies are laying their damning clutches on the unsuspecting form of the republic. Fearful questions confront us. Whether we are to be compelled henceforth to read with downcast gaze the matchless axioms of Jefferson and to mumble in confusion the heroic history of our dead—whether the Fourth of July is to be henceforth a day of embarrassment and shame instead of, as hitherto, an occasion for spontaneous and boundless pride—whether Yorktown and Monmouth are to become events which, instead of inspiring a continent to eulogy and song, shall provoke no higher eloquence than that which gutturals from the limping lips of apology—whether the political wisdom of the founders of the republic, gleaned in terrible hours, by anxious eyes, from the travail of ages past, shall be swept away by the heartless levity of upstart statesmen—whether, in short, we shall turn our backs inexorably upon the past—a past glorious achievement and unrivaled in precept—and become the wretched exemplars of a policy, ruinous to ourselves and to our children, repulsive to every truly civilized mind and destructive of the fairest hopes of humanity—these. are questions that assail with a relentless emphasis on the consciences of great people.
― J. Howard Moore

have just finished your little book on ‘The Logic of Vegetarianism.’ It is the best thing on this subject in existence – bold, brilliant, unanswerable. I am glad you are on earth. If it were not for a very few souls like you, this world would seem to be an intellectual solitude.
― J. Howard Moore

I cannot express myself when I get to thinking about these things—these terrible crimes that man is inflicting year after year on millions of his poor, helpless brothers. I become indignant and desperate. I am ashamed of the race of beings to which I belong. It is so cruel and bigoted, so hypocritical, so soul-less and insane. I’d rather be an insect—a bee or a butterfly—and float in dim dreams among the wildflowers of summer than be a man and feel the wrongs and sufferings of this wretched world.
― J. Howard Moore

Is murder stripped of its blackness by becoming fine art? All assassination is practically instantaneous and painless, the assassination of men as well as that of birds and quadrupeds. What would the author of such nonsense think if the assassination of his brother or mother blandly attempted to relieve himself of all guilt by means of the assurance that his victim had experienced no suffering? The crime of extermination does not consist in the creation of pain, but in the destruction of that precious and mysterious essence called life.
― J. Howard Moore

Human nature is defective. It is selfish. It is cruel and revengeful. It is a product of militancy and hate. It is much better adapted to a fighting life, in which it was generated than it is in cooperation and peace.
― J. Howard Moore

Best J. Howard Moore quotes

In the nature of living beings, there are two elements—that element which impels a living creature to move in behalf or in the interests of itself, and that which prompts or prevents movement out of consideration for others. The former of these two elements is called egoism, the latter, altruism.
― J. Howard Moore

Best J. Howard Moore quotes

Sympathy, the consciousness of kind, means simply the realization or the conscious recognition by living beings of the kinship of content. A human being unconscious of kind, an unsympathetic and inhuman person, is one who is likely to assume that his conscious states are sui generis, that they are more precious and intense than, and intrinsically different from, those of others—one who realizes that an injured sensory is a savage thing in his own organism, but who does not suppose it to be anything of the kind when it hangs to the brain of a Hottentot or a horse. Why do the human rich treat the human poor with such inconsideration? Why do they allow or compel them to remain disinherited and crushed while they themselves loll in superfluous wealth? Because there is an Inadequate consciousness of kind.