New Permanent’s Edward Snowden Image Quotes and book sayings (2019)

New Permanent’s Edward Snowden Image Quotes and Sayings 

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

Edward Joseph Snowden (born June 21, 1983) is an American who was (CIA) employee copied and leaked highly classified information from the National Security Agency (NSA) in 2013.

He was granted temporary asylum in Russia for one year, with extensions possible. According to his Russian lawyer, Snowden went to an undisclosed location for security reasons.

You can check also Quotes of Julian Assange 

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes
Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

The freedom of a country

“The freedom of a country can only be measured by its respect for the rights of its citizens, and it’s my conviction that these rights are in fact limitations of state power that define exactly where and when a government may not infringe into that domain of personal or individual freedoms that during the American Revolution was called “liberty” and during the Internet Revolution is called “privacy.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Peering at life through a window

“Peering at life through a window can ultimately abstract us from our actions and limit any meaningful confrontation with their consequences.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

no way, to ignore privacy

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“There is, simply, no way, to ignore privacy. Because a citizenry’s freedoms are interdependent, to surrender your own privacy is really to surrender everyone’s. you might choose to give it up out of convenience, or under the popular pretext that privacy is only required by those who have something to hide. But saying that you don’t need or want privacy because you have nothing to hide is to assume that no one should have, or could have to hide anything – including their immigration status, unemployment history, financial history, and health records. You’re assuming that no one, including yourself, might object to revealing to anyone information about their religious beliefs, political affiliations and sexual activities, as casually as some choose to reveal their movie and music tastes and reading preferences. Ultimately, saying that you don’t care about privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different from saying you don’t care about freedom of speech because you have nothing to say. Or that you don’t care about freedom of the press because you don’t like to read. Or that you don’t care about freedom of religion because you don’t believe in God. Or that you don’t care about the freedom to peaceably assemble because you’re a lazy, antisocial agoraphobe. Just because this or that freedom might not have meaning to you today doesn’t mean that that it doesn’t or won’t have meaning tomorrow, to you, or to your neighbor – or to the crowds of principled dissidents I was following on my phone who were protesting halfway across the planet, hoping to gain just a fraction of the freedom that my country was busily dismantling.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“The reason you’re reading this book is that I did a dangerous thing for a man in my position: I decided to tell the truth.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“Readers who were born postmillennium might not understand the fuss, but trust me, this was a goddamned miracle. Nowadays, connectivity is just presumed. Smartphones, laptops, desktops, everything’s connected, always. Connected to what exactly? How? It doesn’t matter. You just tap the icon your older relatives call “the Internet button” and boom, you’ve got it: the news, pizza delivery, streaming music, and streaming video that we used to call TV and movies. Back then, however, we walked uphill both ways, to and from school, and plugged our modems directly into the wall, with manly twelve-year-old hands.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“In the 1990s, the Internet had yet to fall victim to the greatest iniquity in digital history: the move by both government and businesses to link, as intimately as possible, users’ online personas to their offline legal identity.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

all any government had to do was select a person or a group to scapegoat and go searching 

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“Once the ubiquity of collection was combined with the permanency of storage, all any government had to do was select a person or a group to scapegoat and go searching – as I’d gone searching through the agency’s files – for evidence of a suitable crime”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“This, to my thinking, actually represented the great nexus of the Intelligence Community and the tech industry: both are entrenched and unelected powers that pride themselves on maintaining absolute secrecy about their developments. Both believe that they have the solutions for everything, which they never hesitate to unilaterally impose. Above all, they both believe that these solutions are inherently apolitical because they’re based on data, whose prerogatives are regarded as preferable to the chaotic whims of the common citizen.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“The fact is, no one with a biography like mine ever comes comfortably to autobiography. It’s hard to have spent so much of my life trying to avoid identification, only to turn around completely and share “personal disclosures” in a book.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“America’s fundamental laws exist to make the job of law enforcement not easier but harder. This isn’t a bug, it’s a core feature of democracy”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“I had hoped to serve my country, but instead I went to work for it. This is not a trivial distinction.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“Once you go digging into the actual technical mechanisms by which predictability is calculated, you come to understand that its science is, in fact, anti-scientific, and fatally misnamed: predictability is actually manipulation. A website that tells you that because you liked this book you might also like books by James Clapper or Michael Hayden isn’t offering an educated guess as much as a mechanism of subtle coercion.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“One major irony here is that law, which always lags behind technological innovation by at least a generation, gives substantially more protections to a communication’s content than to its metadata—and yet intelligence agencies are far more interested in the metadata—the activity records that allow them both the “big picture” ability to analyze data at scale, and the “little picture” ability to make perfect maps, chronologies, and associative synopses of an individual person’s life, from which they presume to extrapolate predictions of behavior.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“Hemingway once wrote, the way to make people trustworthy is to trust them.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“which everyone was a criminal. I tried to talk to Lindsay about all this. But though she was generally sympathetic to my concerns, she wasn’t so sympathetic that she was ready to go off the grid, or even off Facebook or Instagram. “If I did that,” she said, “I’d be giving up my art and abandoning my friends. You used to like being in touch with other people.”― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“Ours was now a country in which the cost of replacing a broken machine with a newer model was typically lower than the cost of having it fixed by an expert, which itself was typically lower than the cost of sourcing the parts and figuring out how to fix it yourself. This fact alone virtually guaranteed technological tyranny, which was perpetrated not by the technology itself but by the ignorance of everyone who used it daily and yet failed to understand it. To refuse to inform yourself about the basic operation and maintenance of the equipment you depended on was to passively accept that tyranny and agree to its terms: when your equipment works, you’ll work, but when your equipment breaks down you’ll break down, too. Your possessions would possess you.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“We landed at Sheremetyevo on June 23 for what we assumed would be a twenty-hour layover. It has now dragged on for over six years. Exile is an endless layover.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

But if a leak’s harmfulness and lack of authorization, not to mention its essential illegality, make a scant difference to the government’s reaction, what does? What makes one disclosure permissible, and another not? The answer is power. The answer controls. Disclosure is deemed acceptable only if it doesn’t challenge the fundamental prerogatives of an institution.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“I was reminded of what is perhaps the fundamental rule of technological progress: if something can be done, it probably will be done, and possibly already has been.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“Instead, I was resolved to bring to light a single, all-encompassing fact: that my government had developed and deployed a global system of mass surveillance without the knowledge or consent of its citizenry.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“It’s one of the great chastening facts of working with systems that the part of a system that malfunctions are almost never the part in which you notice the malfunction.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“It’s unimaginable that a major bank or even a social media outfit would hire outsiders for systems-level work. In the context of the US government, however, restructuring your intelligence agencies so that your most sensitive systems were being run by somebody who didn’t really work for you was what passed for innovation.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“That, ultimately, is the critical flaw or design defect intentionally integrated into every system, in both politics and computing: the people who create the rules have no incentive to act against themselves.”

 the Five Eyes Countries

“Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the UK, the primary countries with which the United States shares intelligence. (Together with the United States, these countries are known as the Five Eyes.)”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

About Nasa

“The NSA’s surveillance programs, it’s domestic surveillance programs, in particular, flouted the Fourth Amendment completely.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Edward Snowden Permanent book quotesEdward Snowden Permanent book quotes

“Ultimately, saying that you don’t care about privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different from saying you don’t care about freedom of speech because you have nothing to say.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“The duty of all persons in the service of the United States, as well as all other inhabitants thereof, to give the earliest information to Congress or any other proper authority of any misconduct, frauds, or misdemeanors committed by any officers or persons in the service of these states, which may come to their knowledge.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“malfeasance has become so structural as to be a matter not of any particular initiative, but of an ideology—proper channels can only become a trap, to catch the heretics and disfavorables.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“Ultimately, every language, including English, demonstrates its culture’s relationship to power by how it chooses to define the act of disclosure. Even the nautically derived English words that seem neutral and benign frame the act from the perspective of the institution that perceives itself wronged, not of the public that the institution has failed.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“And so the geek inherited the earth.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“The truth, though, is that deletion has never existed technologically in the way that we conceive of it. Deletion is just a ruse, a figment, a public fiction, a not-quite-noble lie that computing tells you to reassure you and give you comfort.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“wand, so long as you can keep your personal magic words”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

zero-knowledge

“The best means we have for keeping our keys safe is called “zero-knowledge,” a method that ensures that any data you try to store externally—say, for instance, on a company’s cloud platform—is encrypted by an algorithm running on your device before it is uploaded, and the key is never shared. In the zero-knowledge scheme, the keys are in the users’ hands—and only in the users’ hands. No company, no agency, no enemy can touch them.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“distributed most of the pieces of the incantation”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“the exact point where the state cast its eye on the human and the human remained unaware.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

My mother loved giving me math challenges

“My mother loved giving me math challenges. At Kmart or Winn-Dixie, she’d have me pick out books and model cars and trucks and buy them for me if I was able to mentally add together their prices. Over the course of my childhood, she kept escalating the difficulty, first having me estimate and round to the nearest dollar, then having me figure out the precise dollars-and-cents amount, and then having me calculate 3 percent of that amount and add it on to the total. I was confused by that last challenge—not by the arithmetic so much as by the reasoning. “Why?” “It’s called a tax,” my mother explained. “Everything we buy, we have to pay three percent to the government.” “What do they do with it?” “You like roads, buddy? You like bridges?” she said. “The government uses that money to fix them. They use that money to fill the library with books.” Sometime later, I was afraid that my budding math skills had failed me when my mental totals didn’t match those on the cash register’s display. But once again, my mother explained. “They raised the sales tax. Now you have to add four percent.” “So now the library will get even more books?” I asked. “Let’s hope,” my mother said.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“In the 1990s, the Internet had yet to fall victim to the greatest iniquity in digital history: the move by both government and businesses to link, as intimately as possible, users’ online personas to their offline legal identity. Kids used to be able to go online and say the dumbest things one day without having to be held accountable for them the next. This might not strike you as the healthiest environment in which to grow up, and yet it is precisely the only environment in which you can grow up—by which I mean that the early Internet’s dissociative opportunities actually encouraged me and those of my generation to change our most deeply held opinions, instead of just digging in and defending them when challenged. This ability to reinvent ourselves meant that we never had to close our minds by picking slides or close ranks out of fear of doing irreparable harm to our reputations. Mistakes that were swiftly punished but swiftly rectified allowed both the community and the “offender” to move on. To me, and to many, this felt like freedom.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“You should always let people underestimate you. Because when people misappraise your intelligence and abilities, they’re merely pointing out their own vulnerabilities—the gaping holes in their judgment that need to stay open if you want to cartwheel through later on a flaming horse, correcting the record with your sword of justice.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“what made it “national,” what made it a “conversation,” was that for the first time the American public was informed enough to have a voice.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

“As the years go by, it has become increasingly apparent to me that legislatively reforming the surveillance regime of the country of my birth won’t necessarily help a journalist or dissident in the country of my exile, but an encrypted smartphone might.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record

Frankenstein effect

“Prominent examples of the “Frankenstein effect” cited by after-the-fact civilian, governmental, military, and even IC assessments have included America’s funding and training of the mujahideen to fight the Soviets, which resulted in the radicalization of Osama bin Laden and the founding of al-Qaeda, as well as the de-Baathification of the Saddam Hussein–era Iraqi military, which resulted in the rise of the Islamic state.”
― Edward Snowden, Permanent Record