Best 40+ Seneca’s Priceless Inspirational Image Quotes Sayings from Letters from Stoic

Best 40+ Seneca’s Priceless Inspirational Image Quotes Sayings from Letters from Stoic 

Seneca best sayings

Selected from the Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, these letters illustrate the upright ideals admired by the Stoics and extol a good way of life as seen from their standpoint. They also reveal how far in advance of his time were many of Seneca’s ideas – his disgust at the shows in the arena or his criticism of the harsh treatment of slaves. Philosophical in tone and written in the ‘pointed’ style of the Latin Silver Age these ‘essays in disguise’ were clearly aimed by Seneca at posterity.



It is not about where you live

“If you really want to escape the things that harass you, what you’re needing is not to be in a different place but to be a different person.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Until we have begun to go without them, we fail to realize how unnecessary many things are. We’ve been using them not because we needed them but because we had them.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Seneca on Excessive Pleasure

“Enjoy present pleasures in such a way as not to injure future ones.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“It is not the man who has too little that is poor, but the one who hankers after more.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

People will likely act as you expect them to act

“Regard friend as loyal, and you will make him loyal.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Limiting one’s desires actually helps to cure one of fear. ‘Cease to hope … and you will cease to fear.’ … Widely different [as fear and hope] are, the two of them march in unison like a prisoner and the escort he is handcuffed to. Fear keeps pace with hope … both belong to a mind in suspense, to a mind in a state of anxiety through looking into the future. Both are mainly due to projecting our thoughts far ahead of us instead of adapting ourselves to the present.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Friends are important

“Withdraw into yourself, as far as you can. Associate with those who will make a better man of you. Welcome those whom you yourself can improve. The process is mutual; for men learn while they teach.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

Seneca best sayings

“Nothing is burdensome if taken lightly, and nothing need arouse one’s irritation so long as one doesn’t make it bigger than it is by getting irritated.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“What man can you show me who places any value on his time, who reckons the worth of each day, who understands that he is
dying daily? For we are mistaken when we look forward to death; the major portion of death has already passed,
Whatever years be behind us are in death’s hands.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“You should … live in such a way that there is nothing which you could not as easily tell your enemy as keep to yourself.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Do not call him friend unless you mean it

“But when you are looking on anyone as a friend when you do not trust him as you trust yourself, you are making a grave mistake, and have failed to grasp sufficiently the full force of true friendship.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“To win true freeedom you must be a slave to philosophy.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Of this one thing makes sure against your dying day – that your faults die before you do.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Like knowledge 

“There is no enjoying the possession of anything valuable unless one has someone to share it with”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Philosophy calls for simple living, not for doing penance, and the simple way of life need not be a crude one.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“To be everywhere is to be nowhere.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“What really ruins our character is the fact that none of us looks back over his life.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

if you can not love yourself, how can you love others

“I have learned to be a friend to myself Great improvement this indeed Such a one can never be said to be alone for know that he who is a friend to himself is a friend to all mankind”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“What fortune has made yours is not your own.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Seneca about the beautiful woman

“A woman is not beautiful when her ankle or arm wins compliments, but when her total appearance diverts admiration from the individual parts of her body.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Each day acquire something that will fortify you against poverty, against death, indeed against other misfortunes as well; and after you have run over many thoughts, select one to be thoroughly digested that day.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“The difficulty comes from our lack of confidence.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“People who know no self-restraint lead stormy and disordered lives, passing their time in a state of fear commensurate with the injuries they do to others, never able to relax.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Wild animals run from the dangers they actually see, and once they have escaped them worry no more. We, however, are tormented alike by what is past and what is to come. A number of our blessings do us harm, for memory brings back the agony of fear while foresight brings it on prematurely. No one confines his unhappiness to the present.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Let us say what we feel, and feel what we say; let speech harmonize with life.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“For the only safe harbor in this life’s tossing, the troubled sea is to refuse to be bothered about what the future will bring and to stand ready and confident, squaring the breast to take without skulking or flinching whatever fortune hurls at us.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Because thou writest me often, I thank thee … Never do I receive a letter from thee, but immediately we are together.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

Seneca on Game theory

“As it is with a play, so it is with life – what matters is not how long the acting lasts, but how good it is.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Men do not care how nobly they live, but only how long, although it is within the reach of every man to live nobly within no man’s power to live long.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“When a mind is impressionable and has none too firm a hold on what is right, it must be rescued from the crowd: it is so easy for it to go over to the majority.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

befriend  yourself

“What progress, you ask, have I made? I have begun to be a friend to myself.”
― Seneca, Epistulae Morales Ad Lucilium: Latin Text

the strength of the word

“Words need to be sown like seeds. No matter how tiny seed maybe when in lands in the right sort of ground it unfolds its strength and from being minute expands and grows to a massive size.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from Stoic

“To expect punishment is to suffer it and to earn it is to expect it.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“My advice is really this: what we hear the philosophers saying and what we find in their writings should be applied in our pursuit of a happy life. We should hunt out the helpful pieces of teaching, and the spirited and noble-minded sayings which are capable of immediate practical application—not far-fetched or archaic expressions or extravagant metaphors and figures of speech—and learn them so well that words become works. No one to my mind lets humanity down quite so much as those who study philosophy as if it were a sort of commercial skill and then proceed to live in a quite different manner from the way they tell other people to live.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“The more a mind takes in the more it expands.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Everywhere means nowhere. When a person spends all his time in foreign travel, he ends by having many acquaintances, but no friends. And the same thing must hold true of men who seek intimate acquaintance with no single author but visit them all in a hasty and hurried manner. 3. Food does no good and is not assimilated into the body if it leaves the stomach as soon as it is eaten; nothing hinders a cure so much as frequent change of medicine; no wound will heal when one salve is tried after another; a plant which is often moved can never grow strong. There is nothing so efficacious that it can be helpful while it is being shifted about. And in the reading of many books is a distraction.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Most men ebb and flow in wretchedness between the fear of death and the hardships of life; they are unwilling to live, and yet they do not know how to die. ”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Preserve a sense of proportion in your attitude to everything that pleases you, and make the most of them while they are at their best.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Here is your great soul—the man who has given himself over to Fate; on the other hand, that man is a weakling and a degenerate who struggles and maligns the order of the universe and would rather reform the gods than reform himself.”
― Seneca, Letters From A Stoic: Epistulae Morales AD Lucilium (Illustrated. Newly revised text. Includes Image Gallery + Audio): All Three Volumes

“A guilty person sometimes has the luck to escape detection, but never to feel sure of it.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“It is a great man that can treat his earthenware as if it was silver, and a man who treats his silver as if it was earthenware is no less great.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Count your years and you’ll be ashamed to be wanting and working for exactly the same things as you wanted when you were a boy. Of this one thing make sure against your dying day – that your faults die before you do. Have done with those unsettled pleasures, which cost one dear – they do one harm after they’re past and gone, not merely when they’re in prospect. Even when they’re over, pleasures of a depraved nature are apt to carry feelings of dissatisfaction, in the same way as a criminal’s anxiety doesn’t end with the commission of the crime, even if it’s undetected at the time. Such pleasures are insubstantial and unreliable; even if they don’t do one any harm, they’re fleeting in character. Look around for some enduring good instead. And nothing answers this description except what the spirit discovers for itself within itself. A good character is the only guarantee of everlasting, carefree happiness. Even if some obstacle to this comes on the scene, its appearance is only to be compared to that of clouds which drift in front of the sun without ever defeating its light.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Life is slavery if the courage to die is absent.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Desultory reading is delightful, but to be beneficial, our reading must be carefully directed.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“that you would not anticipate misery since the evils you dread as coming upon you may perhaps never reach you at least they are not yet come Thus some things torture us more than they ought, some before they ought and some which ought never to torture us at all. We heighten our pain either by presupposing a cause or anticipation”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“However much you possess there’s someone else who has more, and you’ll be fancying yourself to be short of things you need to exact extent to which you lag behind him.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Nothing, Lucilius, is ours, except time. We were entrusted by nature with the ownership of this single thing, so fleeting and slippery that anyone who will oust us from possession.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“But only philosophy will wake us; only philosophy will shake us out of that heavy sleep. Devote yourself entirely to her. You’re worthy of her, she’s worthy of you-fall into each other’s arms. Say a firm, plain no to every other occupation.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Why be concerned about others, come to that, when you’ve outdone your own self? Set yourself a limit which you couldn’t even exceed if you wanted to, and say good-bye at last to those deceptive prizes more precious to those who hope for them than to those who have won them. If there were anything substantial in them they would sooner or later bring a sense of fullness; as it is they simply aggravate the thirst of those who swallow them.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Every day as it comes should be welcomed and reduced forthwith into our own possession as if it were the finest day imaginable. What flies past has to be seized at.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“Soft living imposes on us the penalty of debility; we cease to be able to do the things we’ve long been grudging about doing.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“If you look on wealth as a thing to be valued you’ll always fancy yourself to be short of the things you need to the extent to which you lag behind what others have.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“True happiness is to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future, not to amuse ourselves with either hopes or fears but to rest satisfied with what we have, which is sufficient, for he that is so wants nothing.”
― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“An unpopular rule is never long maintained.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“The boon that could be given can be withdrawn.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

“It is uncertain where Death will await you;
there expect it everywhere.”
― Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

for more about Seneca : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seneca_the_Younger